Bearing A Child In Her Arms by Elspeth Young

Bearing A Child In Her Arms


{ Mary and the Christ Child }
Paper prints & posters
High grade art reproductions available on high quality 9pt (100#) paper. Combined shipping available for most smaller sizes.
4" x 6"$4.2012" x 16"$32.0020" x 24"$78.0024" x 36"$140.00
5" x 7"$5.0012" x 18.25"$36.0018" x 27.25"$80.0024" x 36.5"$142.00
8" x 10"$12.0014" x 18"$41.0020" x 28"$91.0030" x 40"$195.00
9" x 13.75"$16.2516" x 20"$52.0020" x 30"$98.0030" x 45.5"$222.00
11" x 17"$20.0016" x 24.25"$63.0020" x 30.25"$99.00
11" x 14"$25.0018" x 24"$70.0024" x 30"$117.00
Giclées on canvas (Pre-mounted)
High grade canvas artwork reproductions premounted to durable gatorboard for easy framing.
6" x 9"$32.0011" x 14"$90.0012" x 18.25"$128.0018" x 24"$252.00
8" x 10"$47.0011" x 17"$110.0014" x 18"$147.00
9" x 13.75"$73.0012" x 16"$112.0016" x 20"$187.00
Giclées on canvas (unmounted)
Large rolled canvas prints that cannot be shipped pre-mounted to gatorboard. These prints come with a 2-inch margin for the customer to mount the print to stretcher bars at their local framing store.
16" x 24.25"$162.0020" x 28"$234.0024" x 30"$300.0030" x 40"$500.00
20" x 24"$200.0020" x 30"$250.0024" x 36"$360.0030" x 45.5"$569.00
18" x 27.25"$205.0020" x 30.25"$253.0024" x 36.5"$365.00
Other products
Other options including the original artwork, bookmarks, and limited edition prints.
Bookmark$1.50Original oil painting$13,321.00 Sold
or
† These prints show the entire painting. All other images are cropped to fit standard frame/print sizes. By purchasing a print, you agree to accept the image shipped to you whether cropped or not, as presented on this site. All print sizes link to a preview of the print. Print sizes are the image dimensions, not the dimensions of the paper. Sizes are rounded up to the nearest 1/8th inch.

And it came to pass that I looked and beheld the great city of Jerusalem, and also other cities. And I beheld the city of Nazareth; and in the city of Nazareth I beheld a virgin, and she was exceedingly fair and white. And it came to pass that I saw the heavens open; and an angel came down and stood before me; and he said unto me: Nephi, what beholdest thou? And I said unto him: A virgin, most beautiful and fair above all other virgins. And he said unto me: Knowest thou the condescension of God? And I said unto him: I know that he loveth his children; nevertheless, I do not know the meaning of all things. And he said unto me: Behold, the virgin whom thou seest is the mother of the Son of God, after the manner of the flesh.

And it came to pass that I beheld that she was carried away in the Spirit; and after she had been carried away in the Spirit for the space of a time the angel spake unto me, saying: Look! And I looked and beheld the virgin again, bearing a child in her arms.

And the angel said unto me: Behold the Lamb of God, yea, even the Son of the Eternal Father! Knowest thou the meaning of the tree which thy father saw? And I answered him, saying: Yea, it is the love of God, which sheddeth itself abroad in the hearts of the children of men; wherefore, it is the most desirable above all things. And he spake unto me, saying: Yea, and the most joyous to the soul.

1 Nephi 11

The story behind Bearing A Child In Her Arms

This painting represents a portion of the vision the prophet Nephi received concerning the life and mission of Jesus Christ "to bear record that he is the son of God" (1 Nephi 11:7). After being shown the tree of life, Nephi requested to know the interpretation of that tree. Accordingly, Nephi was immediately shown a vision of a "virgin...bearing a child in her arms" and was told that that the infant was "the Lamb of God, yea, even the Son of the Eternal Father!" (1 Nephi 11:18, 21). Upon seeing this, an angel questioned Nephi concerning the meaning of the tree of life. Nephi accurately perceived that the tree of life, or Christ, "is the love of God, which sheddeth itself abroad in the hearts of the children of men; wherefore, it is the most desirable above all things...and the most joyous to the soul" (1 Nephi 11:22-23). Indeed, the love of God has never been manifested so plainly to God's children as in the gift of His "only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life" (John 3:16). This visual representation of this moment from Nephi's marvelous vision seeks also to testify of the reality and divinty of the Son of God.

Symbolism in Bearing A Child In Her Arms

The figures of Mary and the Infant Christ are depicted very clearly in the midst of an indistinct background. As befits Nephi's unwavering focus during the vision, there is nothing in the background to distract the viewer from the message in the vision. All elements, even color and light, point to the center of our existence, Jesus Christ, just as the Spirit of the Lord makes it clear to Nephi that the reason he was shown what his father saw was so that he could bear his own witness of Christ.

The Child is loosely wrapped in the type of "swaddling clothes" in which Mary wrapped Him at His birth (see Luke 2:7). Other than the barest hint of a golden trim at the edge of the garment, there is nothing distinctive about the cloth, save its whiteness. Its brilliance symbolizes His purity--what the Apostle Peter described as a "lamb without blemish and without spot: who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world" (1 Peter 1:19-20). The cloth's simplicity is also a reminder of Isaiah's prophecy that there would be "no beauty that we should desire [Christ]" (see Isaiah 53:2). The Hebrew for "beauty" in this case denotes finery of appearance or indication of noble rank. Even so, He is clothed only with the beauty of divinity. Additionally, the swaddling clothes completely hide His noble hands, hands capable of salvation. Even so, His hands are bound until we utilize our agency to accept His matchless gift. His invitation is just that--an invitation: "Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him" (Revelation 3:20).

The viewer is drawn to the Infant's penetrating gaze by the highlight in His eye, contrasted with the dark shadows surrounding Him. Though partly enveloped in the shadows of this world, His light is ever invincible. His mission was to descend below all things and overcome the world--all of the darkness, evil, and despair it has and ever will afford--to rise triumphant as the light of the world, "a light that is endless, that can never be darkened" (Mosiah 16:9). The glimmer in His eye also symbolizes His singleness of purpose in doing His Father's will (see Matthew 6:22 or 3 Nephi 13:22).

Mary's countenance is also radiant, partly from the Heavenly light enveloping the two figures; partly reminding the viewer of Nephi's description her as "exceedingly fair and white...most beautiful and fair above all other virgins" (1 Nephi 11:13, 15). Her beauty borne of goodness is also echoed in the words of Alma, who called her "a precious and chosen vessel" (Alma 7:10).

Mary's hair is seen unveiled, a visual representation of her virginity. In her day, it was customary for maidens to show their hair in public as a sign of their chastity. This, among other cultural clues of apparel may have helped Nephi identify her as a virgin without any help from the angel.

Mary's dress is patterned on traditional Palestinian dress, or shinyar, a costume silhouette dating back 1500 BC. The embroidered ornamentation on its yoke and sleeves is typical of Israelite bridal costume, though it is intended here as another visual symbol of elements in Nephi's vision. The golden motifs embroidered on its sleeves are a tree of life symbol, while the red and gold banding beneath the trees represent the rod of iron which Nephi beheld leading, "to the fountain of living waters, or to the tree of life" (1 Nephi 11:25).

The vessel immediately behind the figures is an oil cask symbolizing the Savior's mission as the Anointed One, sent to earth to "heal the broken-hearted, to preach deliverance to the captives, and recovering of sight to the blind, to set at liberty them that are bruised" (Luke 4:18). The cluster of purple anemones beside the cask are the kind of flower believed by many scholars to be the "lilies of the field" described in the Sermon on the Mount. Here, they remind the viewer of the Savior's teachings concerning Heaven's constant watchcare and mindfulness.
© By Elspeth Young, All Rights Reserved. You may not print, copy, or reproduce this artwork or make derivative works from it without the prior written consent of the copyright holder. For permissions, please review our FAQ page.





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Illustration: Bearing A Child In Her Arms

By Al R. Young
High-resolution digital copies are available from the Studios for use as illustrations.  Use the serial number—appearing below the thumbnail—in requesting permission from the Studios (see links at the bottom of this page for detail).


The correct form of attribution when publishing an image is specified in the license agreement issued to the publisher by Al Young Studios.Guidelines for requests to copy or publish artworks created by the Artists of Al Young Studios

Guidelines for commissioning Al Young Studios to create illustrations
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The original image is available for sale, please contact us for details... Read more »

Tags: Bearing A Child In Her Arms, 2012, Book of Mormon characters


Illustration: Bearing A Child In Her Arms

By Al R. Young
High-resolution digital copies are available from the Studios for use as illustrations.  Use the serial number—appearing below the thumbnail—in requesting permission from the Studios (see links at the bottom of this page for detail).


The correct form of attribution when publishing an image is specified in the license agreement issued to the publisher by Al Young Studios.Guidelines for requests to copy or publish artworks created by the Artists of Al Young Studios

Guidelines for commissioning Al Young Studios to create illustrations
Return to this portfolio
Browse all portfolios
Browse Newsroom articles about Illustration
The original image is available for sale, please contact us for details... Read more »

Tags: Bearing A Child In Her Arms, 2012, People and Stories of the Bible


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